National Reading Month: A Q&A on The Love of Reading with Members of the CHD Community

For the month of March, PCHA will be focusing on the theme of National Reading Month. In the 2nd post of our series, PCHA asked members from across the spectrum of our CHD Community to tell us what they love about reading. Sharing with us this week, about what reading has brought to their lives, are Megan Setzer from the perspective of her son Caleb, born with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome, Alison Connors, mother of two heart warriors, McKenzie and Archer, and Carol Raimondi, an Adult CHD patient with Congenitally Corrected Transposition of the Great Arteries.

 

PCHA:  Why do you love to read?

Megan + Caleb: I’m still learning to read. I love being read to. I like feeling like I’m part of the story.

Alison: Reading is a great escape for me. When I read I am able take time to myself to decompress. Life can be stressful and having that outlet is so important. Reading is probably the most important skill you learn besides math.

Carol:  I love to read because it relaxes me. It allows my mind to focus on the story, and take me to wherever it is set. I can be in a place where the characters are, and that lets me temporarily forget any stresses or worries I have going in my life. 

 

PCHA: Where’s the best place to settle in with a good book?

Megan + Caleb: Anywhere. My favorite place is to snuggle into my bed and look at books before I go to sleep at night.

Alison: The best place to read a book is anywhere! A good book can be read in the loudest place imaginable, because once you start reading you are taken to a different place anyway!

Carol: I love stretching out in bed when I read. Being somewhere with little distraction is key!

 

PCHA: What’s the best part of your favorite book?

Megan + Caleb: Everything! I don’t really have a favorite.

Alison: For me, I like to read historical biographies of famous figures, like Abraham Lincoln, Che, Jackie O and Benjamin Franklin. Reading about the lives of historical figures and about our past customs in American history is a favorite of mine.

Carol:  I really don’t have one favorite book. Anytime I can relax and read for an extended period of time makes me happy!

 

PCHA: What character, from any book, do you most identify with?

Megan + Caleb: There is a small part of all the characters that I can identify with. I am strong like the Super Heroes that I read about and I’m silly like the funny creatures in the Dr. Seuss books.

Alison: When reading historical biographies I don’t necessarily identify with the characters I read about, but one thing about reading about someone’s history is that the past does sometimes repeat itself so I can see how America and the world hasn’t really changed as much as we all assume it has. Technology has changed but as human beings we are still fighting over the same things, fighting for the same things and uniting about the same things. It’s very interesting.

Carol: I tend to identify with any female lead character. Someone who has obstacles to overcome time and time again, but stays strong and shows perseverance. 

 

PCHA: Do you have a favorite author or genre? What do you like about that style?

Megan + Caleb: Dr. Seuss is my favorite author, because his books are funny.

Alison: Historical biographies are pretty much all I read. I figure I’d like to learn something while I am making the time to read. Abraham Lincoln is probably one of the most interesting people I have ever read about. How he ran the country, how he united with his rival, his views on leadership, and work ethic really impressed me. As a person you are always evolving, so whenever I can learn something from reading, I feel accomplished.

Carol: I tend to vary on the genre I read. Sometimes I will read medical non-fiction, as I enjoy learning about disease management and how others have handled living with chronic illness. Other times, I prefer to go the exact opposite and stay light by reading fantasy books. Anything with a vampire or werewolf will suffice! It is nice to escape reality and let my imagination go wild!

 

PCHA: Have you ready any books involving characters with CHD? How’s they hold up to your own experience?

Megan + Caleb: I have read the book, Zipline…It’s about a girl who had a heart surgery, and she is all better now.  Unlike this character, I have had multiple heart surgeries.  I also have a hard time keeping up with my friends when they are running around the playground.

Alison: I have not yet read any books involving characters with CHD! I will have to look into that! Every CHD story is different, which probably why CHD is not as well-known as I would like. Having over 35 different types, so many different outcomes, and sometimes having multiple CHDs really makes every Heart Family’s perspective completely unique, but I think each of us, whether your child’s ASD closed by itself or whether you child is on his/her 4th surgery, we’re all the same. We’re shocked, worried parents who strive to give our children the best life possible, and we’re not alone in this CHD heart journey. Heart parents and patients are pretty passionate people, so I think I would definitely relate to a book with a CHD character.

Carol: I have read several books with CHD patients as the main character. In some cases, I have identified completely with the feelings they have shared, to the point where it hits too close to home, and I need to put the book down for a few days. In other circumstances, I felt like the CHD patient did not give a good representation of what life is like with heart defects. It was either overdramatized or made to seem like it wasn’t a big deal. I prefer a happy medium between the two.

 

PCHA: What’s missing from bookstores? What book would you like to see on the shelves?

Megan + Caleb: I don’t know what’s missing from the bookstores, because most of my books come from the school Book Fair, in the mail, or are on my tablet. I love it when the Book Fair comes to my school and seeing all the different types of books that they have!

Alison: We lost my husband’s Mother, Nicky, suddenly last year. She was a fiction writer. She worked hard for her kids, and, when they were grown, she worked hard for herself. She went to Columbia College in Chicago and worked there as well. She was the coolest person to have as a Mother-in-Law; every time I talked to her she challenged my thinking, inspired me to be a strong woman, and always gave my husband a hard time, which was fun to see! I always thought we would have more time with her. I would love to see her works put into a book. She always talked about having so many works, pages and pages of unfinished work, a life unfinished. Maybe one day, as a family, we can make that happen. I would love to sit one day, open a book by Nicky Chakalis, and read it to the next generation of our family. For me, that’s what is missing on the bookshelves. 

Carol: I would love to see more books geared towards teens on living with chronic illness, whether CHD or not. I think this an important age group that needs as much information as they can get.  What book would I like to see on the shelf? A manual for life with CHD, from pre-natal diagnosis through adulthood, with chapters specifically for family members, friends, spouses and health care providers. That’s not asking too much, right?

 

Megan Setzer is a mother of a child with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome. With a background in Social Work, it has become her passion to provide support and resources to those impacted by CHD.  Shortly after her son’s birth in 2009, Megan chartered Mended Little Hearts of Winchester as a way to connect area families and to offer support and resources. Under her leadership, the group was honored with the 2012 MLH Group Excellence Award and it continued to grow its network. In 2013, her group expanded geographically and became Mended Little Hearts of the Shenandoah Valley, serving families in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and Panhandle of West Virginia. She was elected as the Mended Little Hearts National Board Director in 2013, where she served until December 2016. She is currently serving as a Board Director for the Pediatric Congenital Heart Association.Megan has a Bachelor’s of Social Work from James Madison University, graduating in 1999.  She worked for almost 10 years as a Medical Social Worker, and is now employed in the health technology field as a Clinical Advisor, specializing in care transitions. When she is not volunteering, she is kept busy by her husband and two boys. She loves to read and crochet.

Alison Connors is a mother of three children: McKenzie, Jackson and Archer. Her oldest McKenzie and youngest Archer both had open heart surgery for congenital heart defects. McKenzie and Archer have been in the care of the PSHU team at Advocate Children’s Hospital in Oak Lawn, Illinois since birth. Alison has been married since 2009 to her best friend Christopher, and she recently went back to work as a 1:1 teacher’s aide for children with special needs. She and her family have a busy life, but she has a passion for volunteering and believes that there is healing power in taking part in something that is bigger than yourself. Having two children with CHD threw Alison onto a path she never expected to be on, but a path her family is very grateful to be on. It’s an honor for Alison and her family to share resources, give hope, and support to others who face the same situations that they have.

 

Carol Raimondi is an adult CHD patient and nurse, living with Congenitally Corrected Transposition of the Great Arteries.  She has had 4 open heart surgeries in her 40 years, as well as a pacemaker since the age of 6. After spending a large part of her childhood in and out of hospitals, she developed a passion for nursing. She went to school to become a cardiac nurse. Carol’s many hospital experiences helped her as a nurse to better understand what her patients were going through and  to care for them with that much more compassion and empathy.

Due to worsening medical issues, Carol had to give up the profession she loved. That did not stop her from being a patient advocate, however. She joined her local hospital’s’ Patient Family Advisory Council, which she now co-chairs, and shortly thereafter she joined Mended Little Hearts Chicago(MLHC) as an adult CHD liaison. She then expanded her work in the CHD community by starting an adult and teen CHD group within MLHC and became an  Ambassador for the Adult Congenital Heart Association. Currently she sits as the Pediatric Congenital Heart Association of IL(PCHA-IL) Vice President and State officer, after a recent transition from MLHC. Her proudest moments are when she is advocating and raising awareness for the CHD community, both on Capitol Hill in D.C. and locally.

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