Be #CHDWise and be a part of our Give a HOOT about CHD Campaign!

Here are a few key ways to join the movement:


Hello Echo!

We enlisted your help to name our cute, cuddly, and wise owl and boy did you deliver! With over 70% of the votes – we officially have a winner! With your overwhelming support, the name of the official mascot of The Pediatric Congenital Heart Association is hereby named Echo and we love him – Thank you for your participation!

 

 

 


Purchase an Owl

This adorable plush owl stands 8 inches tall. His fur is soft enough to melt anyone’s heart. The heart on his chest represents the community’s efforts to conquer congenital heart disease, making this a must for everyone you know who is touched by CHD. We will also be adding these owls to our existing care package program through our state chapters so they will included in select kits we provide to patients and families impacted by CHD.

Comfort a loved one, spread awareness, or simply show that you “Give a Hoot About CHD!” Echo can fly right to your doorstep by purchasing him from our online store or directly from the voting page!

 

Color with Echo

Break out the crayons, markers, colored pencils, or paint! Add color to the page and bring Echo to life! Now available, a printable coloring page to print out for the whole family to color as they wish.

Click the image or click here to Color with Echo!

Want to submit your finished masterpieces to be featured on our Instagram? Great! Just upload a picture of your finished coloring page and email to Echo at Echo@conqueringchd.org


Success!

 

Our Give a HOOT booster campaign has ended but because of your amazing support we were able to sell 159 shirts to raise $1810 to directly impact the lives of CHD patients and families through our programs like public reporting, the guided questions tool, care packages, and the legislative conference. Shirts will be delivered 2-3 weeks AFTER the campaign closed on 11-15-17

CLICK HERE to check out the shirts and view the supporters

 


Use your Social Media talents as we work to reach new families!

It’s your month to shine and show your friends and family what it means to be #CHDWise!

This year has been a great year and our social media following has grown exponentially, allowing us to reach more families than ever before. We’re currently at 16,000 likes on our facebook page and we would love to be sitting at at least 16,500 followers by the end of the month! The more patients and families our message can reach, the greater the impact that we can have.

Join the Social Media Storm

During this month help us cover social media with CHD facts and faces. Like, share, comment and tag using the hashtag #CHDWise.

In the know – Help others understand the impact of CHD and what the Pediatric Congenital Heart Association is doing about it by sharing our memes throughout the month.

Make it personal – Using the hashtag #CHDWise, share stories and photos about about how you and your family are #ConqueringCHD. This is all about sharing how Congenital Heart Disease impacts patients and families and how we, together, can educate everyone to be #CHDWise. Don’t forget to tag us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram!

Invite others – we can do the work for you – simply guide them to our media pages.  Ask them to like or follow us.  We’ll make sure they STAY engaged!  Click on an icon to find us:

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Encourage your Members of Congress to be #CHDWise

Tell your representatives why they should give a hoot about CHD!  Ask them to join you in #ConqueringCHD by becoming cosponsor of the Congenital Heart Futures Reauthorization Act (CHFRA).  Click here to learn more and see if your lawmaker has already signed-on.  If they have, be sure to thank them for #ConqueringCHD!!


Check out what’s happening in your neck of the woods

Help improve the lives of those with congenital heart disease and their families through direct support and education – meeting families where they are.  Through local activities like peer-to-peer support, care package distribution and educational materials, we are working directly with patients, families and medical professionals impacting one life at a time. Get connected to a chapter near you.

 

 


Mark your calendars

 

#GivingTuesday is a day that the world recognizes the importance of giving back.

This global day of giving follows Black Friday and Cyber Monday and encourages communities to contribute to their favorite nonprofits and help kick off the giving season!

It’s a great way for us to reach new audiences who may not be familiar with our  mission.

Our mission is to Conquer Congenital Heart Disease. We are accomplishing this through collaboration with patients, parents, providers, and partner organizations to improve quality and outcomes through CHD education, support, research and awareness.

Give Knowledge. Give a Voice. Give Hope.

 


Finally, Celebrate how #CHDWise you are and all we are doing, together, to Conquer CHD! Don’t forget to use the hashtag #CHDWise when you share your stories and pictures 

Teen Topics – Advocating for Yourself

Annaleci was taught at a young age how to speak up for herself. She found, as she grew up, just how important that is , especially when it comes to her healthcare and advocating for her needs.This week, Anna shares her story with us. 

 

My life growing up, from an outsider’s point was hectic, but this was my family’s normal. From the moment I was born nothing went as planned. The two young parents were expecting a healthy baby and instead 8 hours after I was born, were told that their child only had a 10% chance of living. Little did my parents know, that moments like that will be their normal for the rest of their lives. Even though I survived the first 2 surgeries after so many complications, my family and I have always lived on our toes. Just waiting for the next 6 month checkup to see if we were in the clear or if it was time. While I grew, I became more and more conscious of myself and that what I was born with will never go away.

My parents were the type to always answer my questions with complete honesty. Along with that they pushed for me to have a great understanding of myself. I don’t just mean the medical definition of my defect, but how to tell if something was wrong with my body. My mother, especially, taught me how to put how I was feeling into words, which, in return, taught me how to really talk to my doctors myself. From a very young age, I remember my mother telling me how important it is for me to do the talking at appointments. I am extremely thankful for that now because when I go to the doctors, I go in by myself and have the ability to sit down and advocate for my health.

I was not warned very much about the transition into adult care. In the beginning, I felt as if I was going to be clumped into a group of adults with acquired heart problems. I was nervous that I would be over looked, but I made my worries apparent during appointments. I was given a choice between staying with my cardiologist or switching to an adult CHD specialist. I decided to go with the specialist, and so far I’ve noticed that during my appointments we talk a lot more about my social life and what my future looks like. Also usually there is a social worker with us, who talks to me about transition, the mental emotional sides of things, and future plans/goals. During these recent appointments I have learned how important it is to be able to speak for myself. Along with that, I have gained a greater appreciation for all of the hard work that my parents have put into giving me the best education and medical care growing up. It’s not easy juggling everything from appointment planning to navigating the medical system. There are support systems put in place that really do help you navigate, what feels like a never ending pile of paperwork and questions. I have learned this past year the importance of knowing myself, and to accept that this is my normal, and that’s ok because I am extremely lucky to be where i am in life today.

 

Annaleci Lamantia is18 years old and lives in Western New York, in a small town named Avon. She was born with a complex CHD called Truncus Arteriosus Type 2. Her first open heart surgery was at only three days old, a second surgery was at two years old, and her most recent was at twelve years old. Annaleci has struggled throughout her life with chronic pain, a weakened immune system, and depression/anxiety. School wasn’t easy, but with determination and support from her family and peers, she graduated last year. Now at this point of her life, Annaleci is trying to figure out this difficult transition into adult care and working on managing her health on her own.

 

School Intervention Series: Advocating for a Program

In her final post of a three-part series, Kyle Herma, School Intervention Specialist at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, details how to start advocating for a dedicated school liaison at your cardiac center. If you missed the series, you can find her first post here and Complete Resource Guide here.

 

 

 

Advocating for equal accesses to quality education for children with complex health needs is often a difficult process. At times, the numerous boundaries families face seem to make it almost impossible to get appropriate evaluations and support services in place, especially within schools. It is in the untangling of these messy webs of communication and information where I find some of my most fulfilling work. Having a dedicated school liaison position within your cardiac center (usually as part of a multidisciplinary neurodevelopmental follow-up team) is an ideal situation for receiving whole-child focused, comprehensive care; however, there are many ways for parents to step in and be the driving force in centers that have not yet established these types of innovative programs.

Understanding Neuropsychology

Neuropsychology is the study of the relationship between the brain and behavior. During a neurodevelopmental evaluation a child’s level of cognition and intellectual functioning, emotional and behavioral functioning, and social functioning are assessed. Each assessment will track milestone progress in areas such as: motor skills, play skills, feeding, language development, growth, nutrition, and hearing. The goals of this type of assessment are to identify the child’s ability to function in a group of same-age peers, identify the factors that influence their actions and reactions, determine how levels of functioning  are influenced across different medical treatment/intervention stages, determine the response to or recovery from specific treatments, monitor overall brain development, and provide recommendations for schools in effort to implement appropriate special education services and other learning supports. A neuropsychological evaluation is typically recommended for children between the ages of 6 month to 18 years, who are at high risk for developmental disorders, disabilities, or differences. While the child’s age determines the way they are evaluated, this assessment usually consists of formal pencil-paper testing and interactive completion tasks such as match-making, completing patterns or sequences, and following oral directions. In addition, the neuropsychologist/psychologist will review psychosocial family factors, as well as the child’s developmental and medical history.

The Benefits of a Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Follow-up Program

Children with congenital heart disease are considered high-risk for developmental differences and delays due to many factors related to their medical history, including medication, treatments, and surgical repairs. Fortunately, research also shows that with early identification of these learning delays and appropriate follow-up services put in place, these children can go on to lives long and successful lives.

Neurodevelopmental follow-up programs are designed around a multidisciplinary team of experts who conduct regular, comprehensive assessments of a child’s growth and progress in all areas of functioning and development (also called “neurodevelopment”), and provide families with important information, recommendations, and resources needed to ensure the best possible educational outcomes.  There are several school-age transition points that tend to show an increase of challenges (for example: 3rd grade is a time when children become more independent at school, thus learning difficulties become more evident; the transition from 5th to 6th grade requires a shift in complex problem-solving and organizational skills, and so on). Ongoing neurodevelopmental evaluation is recommended as it is typical for new concerns to arise at different developmental stages.

Once a neurodevelopmental evaluation has been conducted, families will have a better understanding of their child’s overall level of functioning and specific cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Recommendations may be given for academic assistance in terms of accommodation or modification in school or for further psychological or psychiatric therapies/treatments/evaluations. Recommendations may also include planning for transitional service from pediatric to adult care. Most evaluations will also conclude with recommendations for continued skill development at home, ideas for discipline and/or behavior management, and additional resources for support.

Advocating for Neurodevelopmental Follow-up, School Intervention, and Like-programs

I always recommend that my families educate themselves on the developmental milestones of “typically developing” children. I whole-heartedly believe that all children are different and hit “normal” milestones at all different times, but early identification of differences or delays (even if it’s just scheduling an assessment or evaluation) overwhelmingly leads to higher overall academic success rates.

Once you’ve noticed a concern it is important to talk to your child’s primary care provider (general pediatrician) or cardiologist right away. These medical providers will be able to listen to your concerns and help identify action steps (i.e. request an Individualized Education Plan, set up a Neurodvelopmental follow-up, etc). In the event that your cardiac center does not have formal programs in place to assess and assist with neurodevelopmental and educational challenges, there are still ways to seek necessary support. For example, most cardiac programs have a dedicated social worker. A family might request to work with a social worker to express school concerns and connect with existing resources or school support services found within the community. The social worker might be able to schedule a meeting with a hospital-based psychologist or child life specialist who can further assist if your cardiac center does not have these as dedicated cardiac positions.

Parents as Advocates

Parents are often the strongest driving force behind hospital innovation. If your cardiac program does not have access to neurodevelopmental or school support services, you should be asking the question, “why not?” I encourage families to ask their providers, “where do you send your patients for neurodevelopmental follow-up?” (as opposed to the question, “do you offer any neurodevelopmental follow-up?”) and push them to make those hospital-based and community connections to complete their child’s medical team needs. Stay vocal and active in this movement to make neurodevelopmental follow-up and school liaison services part of the expected standard of pediatric healthcare, specifically in the area of cardiology, where this type of comprehensive medical follow-up program is still very new.

Wan tot learn more about the Herma Heart Center’s Neurodevelopmental Follow-up Program? Visit http://www.chw.org/medical-care/herma-heart-center/programs/developmental-follow-up-program/

Want to learn more about the Herma Heart Center’s School Intervention Program? Visit http://www.chw.org/medical-care/herma-heart-center/programs/school-intervention-program/


Kyle Herma

Kyle Herma is the School Intervention Specialist serving the Herma Heart Center at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. Kyle has been at Children’s since February 2015 conducting a formal pilot study on school intervention and the impact it has on a child’s overall medical outcome and quality of life. Prior to this position, Kyle was a teacher at Milwaukee College Prep’s 38th street campus. In both roles, Kyle has shown her dedication to serving children who are placed at-risk for school failure and ultimate mission to achieve equal access to quality education for all.

School Intervention Series: A Complete Resource Guide

PCHA welcomes back Kyle Herma, School Intervention Specialist at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin School for part 2 of her 3 part series about School Intervention. If you missed her first post, you can find it here. Today, we re-share Kyle’s wealth of information on navigating a school’s system without a dedicated school liaison. Her complete resource list is included at the end of this post for easy reference. 

Going back to school after a diagnosis or hospitalization can be scary for everyone! Families might worry about how their child will transition, schools might worry about how they will care for the child, and children might worry about what to say and how to act around friends they haven’t seen in a while (just to name a few examples). Each and every one of these concerns is valid and understandable. So, how do we swing that pendulum of emotion from feeling anxious to feeling prepared? I like to think of it as a 3-step process: proactive planning, clear communication, and seeking appropriate supports. The goal for this second part of my series is to give you a variety of resources, tips, tricks, and recommendations to successfully accomplish all three.

Proactive Planning

School is one of the best distractions a child can have! School provides a predictable structure with scheduled events, activities, responsibilities, and expectations. These are all things that will greatly benefit children who have experienced significant unpredictability in their lives. Yet, we know that return to routine can be overwhelming at times. The Center for Children with Special Needs and Seattle Children’s partnered up to create a great checklist for planning your child’s return to school. You can find that checklist here.

When I meet with families who are preparing for a new school year I always share two “Back-to-School” information sheets. Battling the Back-to-School Butterflies helps families plan for the big day by suggesting some tips for easing back into a school routine and Back-to-School To Do’s is a list of compiled questions to ask yourself while planning for an organized transition back to school. Thinking points, if you will!

Attendance is another major topic that comes up when I am working with families on school re-integration. We all know that children with chronic illness (regardless of the type) miss school more frequently than their healthy peers. Since the attendance patterns children form in school are closely linked to their ability to successfully maintain a job as an adult, I always stress attempting to make medical appointments before or after school, and if this is not possible, to work with your child’s teacher to find a time where the least core curriculum will be missed. Remember, missing a class period does not just mean you are missing the information covered in the textbook, it also means you are missing explanations, examples, peer questions, opportunities to practice and share reasoning’s, etc. – things that cannot be replicated when completing the make-up assignment at home. Proactive Planning for Necessary Absences is the info sheet that I often share with families as they create a plan that seeks to accommodate both a busy appointment schedule and optimum school attendance. It won’t always work out perfectly and that’s OK – your child’s health comes first! I just want it to be something that’s considered along the way.

Clear and Consistent Communication

Sharing information about your child’s medical history, current medical status, or potential medical challenges in the future can be really hard and often emotional. Schools understand that. They don’t want to know all of your child’s medical history to be nosey; they need to know it so they can ensure they are providing the best and safest care. It is within those uncomfortable conversations that trusting relationships are built – it’s OK to be vulnerable and it’s OK to not know all the answers. Use this opportunity to work together to find them. Ten Tips for Caregivers is an excellent starting point for quick tips on creating those meaningful partnerships with your child’s teacher/school.

Next, I encourage every family I work with to create some form of Getting to Know Me document to be given to teachers, administrators, coaches, substitutes … any staff who works with your child. Once again, I found one that I love while searching the Center for Children with Special Needs website (www.cshcn.org). This Getting To Know Me template highlights the child’s interests and strengths before getting into medical diagnosis and current health status. That’s how it should be – after all, were talking about a child!

In addition to informing all teachers and school staff, I also encouraging the sharing of basic information with the families of classroom peers. The purpose of sending out a class letter (much like one you would receive if a child in the classroom had a peanut allergy) is to make sure classmates are washing their hands regularly, cleaning their shared and personal spaces frequently, and either staying home or communicating when they are sick. The class letter is the most frequently requested of all the resources I share with patient families. As you’ll see from my sample letter, I encourage including vaccination information on the opposite side for any family that may be overdue for or on the fence about getting vaccinated. Please personalize it using your preferred wording and share it with your child’s teacher … it could mean far fewer germs spreading through the classroom each year.

Bullying is also a topic that comes up over and over again with the patients I see. Bullying is something I take very seriously and prioritize whenever possible, however often times when I investigate these concerns the findings are split. Sometimes true bullying is taking place and we need to put an intervention plan into action immediately. Other times (more often than not), we are finding that children’s with chronic illnesses who’ve experienced long hospital stays and constant one-on-one attention from adults, tend to have a hard time re-integrating into environments that follow expectations of sharing, turn-taking, and delayed gratification. In many of the cases I’ve reviewed, the intervention that we ultimately put into place, is re-learning appropriate group social skills and accepting that each day moments of success (where we get what we want) and disappointment (moments where we do not) and learning how to appropriately communicate the feelings associate with both. Parents Act Now is a great starting point for understanding what bullying is and how to begin a conversation with your child’s school to ensure that all students feel safe and respected at all times.

The Power of Effective Support Services

I urge families to stay aware of normal developmental guidelines and corresponding developmental milestones. I am a firm believer that all children develop differently and at their own pace, however I also know that neurodevelopmental differences due to medical diagnoses, repairs, and treatments can appear at many different times. There is no academic, social, or emotional delay that cannot be accommodated for, however, it first must be identified. I highly urge you to seek some sort of neurodevelopmental follow-up evaluation from your medical provider if you do begin noticing a developmental difference or delay. The National Association of School Psychologists published a great brief guide to understanding and identifying disabilities. You can find that here. Remember, the earlier you seek necessary support, the better the chances of a positive outcome.

When it comes to establishing support services in school, one thing that I get asked all of the time is, “Who’s responsibility is it?” It doesn’t matter the illness at hand, the child’s current status, or even the rest of the question. The answer is always, “It’s everybody’s responsibility.” I often use a guide for families, schools, and students that breaks down individual responsibilities nicely. You can find that info sheet here. Almost every patient we see has some sort of special education service in place, or qualifies for one. My families often come to me with several questions regarding what services are available for their child and how they go about getting some sort of help in place. Special education support accounts for 24% of my current school interventions – nearly a quarter of the families I work with. To make it easier, I’ve created explanations about the three major services that are offered in schools: a Response to Intervention (RtI) Plan, a 504 Plan, and anIndividualized Education Plan (IEP). Click on each link to learn more about what each program offers and the criteria to qualify for that service. Click here to see a useful graphic for deciding which service best fits your child’s needs. There is one main thing that every parent must know and be prepared to challenge: a school can never refuse or delay a parent’s request for a special education evaluation (“it’s too early/late in the school year” or “they won’t qualify for these services” should NEVER be accepted answers). Unfortunately, families often still run into problems requesting or receiving these services for a variety of reasons. Click here to read the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction’s guidelines for disagreeing with a school’s decision and the information for a full mediation and resolution process. Please note, these guidelines vary by state. Check with your state’s Department of Public Instruction for your most accurate information.

I couldn’t end without the mention of another one of the Herma Heart Center’s top school integration programs. Project ADAM (Automated Defibrillators in Adam’s Memory) is a national hospital-based community outreach program supporting implementation of written and practiced cardiac emergency response plans for sudden cardiac arrest in schools. My final piece of advice for all cardiac families – whether it’s returning for a new school year or school re-integration after an extended hospital stay- make sure your child’s school has both an up-to-date Automated External Defibrillator (AED) and an emergency cardiac response plan in place. You will find the Project ADAM Wisconsin Heart Safe Schools Checklist here. Take this checklist to your school’s nurse or administrator and request they complete and return it to Project ADAM if they haven’t already done so. Project ADAM will work with the school to make sure they have the necessary technology, appropriate emergency action plans, and a schedule of practices and drills to maintain optimum cardiac safety in school.

I hope you’ve found some useful information to set your child on a path to a successful school year. Below you will find one final recap of my shared resources and links. Remember, you are the expert on your child, but I urge you take advantage of those individuals, agencies, and programs there to support you!

Complete School Intervention Resource List

Proactive Planning

Communication

Services


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Kyle Herma is the School Intervention Specialist serving the Herma Heart Center at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. Kyle has been at Children’s since February 2015 conducting a formal pilot study on school intervention and the impact it has on a child’s overall medical outcome and quality of life. Prior to this position, Kyle was a teacher at Milwaukee College Prep’s 38th street campus. In both roles, Kyle has shown her dedication to serving children who are placed at-risk for school failure and ultimate mission to achieve equal access to quality education for all.

Cosponsor the Congenital Heart Futures Act of 2017 (S.477/H.R.1222)

 

 

We urge Congress to cosponsor the Congenital Heart Futures Reauthorization Act (S.477/H.R.1222). To cosponsor this important legislation please contact Max Kanner (max_kanner@durbin.senate.gov) with Senator Durbin’s office or Shayne Woods (Shayne.Woods@mail.house.gov) with Congressman Bilirakis’ office.


Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect and the leading cause of birth defect-related infant mortality. Nearly one third of children born with CHD will require life-saving medical intervention such as surgery or a heart catheterization procedure. With improved medical treatment options, survival rates are improving with a population of 2.4 million and growing. However, there is no cure. Children and adults with congenital heart disease require ongoing, costly, specialized cardiac care and face a lifelong risk of permanent disability and premature death. As a result, healthcare utilization among the congenital heart disease population is significantly higher than the general population.

As part of these ongoing public health surveillance and research efforts, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently published key findings that report hospital costs for congenital heart disease exceeded $6 billion in 2013.

Congenital Heart Disease is common and costly, and attention to the needs of this community is critical.

 

Original Congenital Heart Futures Act

First passed into law in 2010, the bipartisan Congenital Heart Futures Act was groundbreaking legislation authorizing research and data collection specific to Congenital Heart Disease.  This law called for expanded infrastructure to track the epidemiology of CHD at the CDC and increased lifelong CHD research at the NIH.

Since the enactment of the Congenital Heart Futures Act, Congress has appropriated $11 million to the CDC for these activities. The Congenital Heart Futures Act also urged the NHLBI to continue its use of its multi-centered congenital heart research network, the Pediatric Heart Network (PHN) that help guide the care of children and adults with CHD. Together, these efforts have improved our understanding of CHD across the lifespan, the age-specific prevalence, and factors associated with dropping out of appropriate specialty care.

We are excited that the reauthorization of this important law will allow the CDC and NIH to build upon existing programs and focus on successful activities addressing this public health need.  First re-introduced in 2015, the CHRFA did not get passed during the 2015-2016 Congress.  It was reintroduced in February of 2017 with some changes to the language to help forward movement of the bill, but the basic intent of the legislation is the same.

 

Key Aspect of the new Reauthorization Bill

The CHFRA continues these important activities and builds on them by:

  • Assessing the current research needs and projects related to CHD across the lifespan at the NIH.The bill directs the NIH to assess its current research into CHD so that we can have a better understanding of the state of biomedical research as it relates to CHD
  • Expanding research into CHD. The bill directs the CDC to continue to build their public health research and surveillance programs. This will help us understand healthcare utilization, demographics, lead to evidence-based practices and guidelines for CHD.
  • Raising awareness of CHD through the lifespan. The bill allows for CDC to establish and implement a campaign to raise awareness of congenital heart disease. Those who have a CHD and their families need to understand their healthcare needs promote the need for pediatric, adolescent and adult individuals with CHD to seek and maintain lifelong, specialized care.

This comprehensive approach to CHD – the most prevalent birth defect – will address a necessary public health issue and lead to better quality of life and care for those with CHD.

If you have any questions about this legislation, please contact our Director of Programs, Amy Basken, at abasken@conqueringchd.org.

Together, we will CONQUER CHD!

 

Action Alert – Remind your Senators to fund CDC Efforts

DEADLINE: Friday May 12

Act Today!

Ask your member of Congress to Sign the Durbin-Grassley FY2018 Congenital Heart Disease Appropriations Letter.

It might be hard to look beyond the health care issues at hand, but there are other important Congenital Heart Disease issues that need our attention in Washington D.C., as well!

Each year, we need to make sure that Congress continues to fund the congenital heart disease public health research and data collection at the National Center for Birth Defect and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD), with-in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This budget process is called Appropriations.  Senators Durbin and Grassley have drafted a letter to the Appropriations Committee asking them to support funding for the CDC program to better understand and treat the lifelong needs of those living with congenital heart disease.  They are seeking as many Senator’s signatures as possible.

Email, call, or tweet your Senator or their health staff and ask them to reach out to Max Kanner (Max_Kanner@durbin.senate.gov), today!

 

American Stroke Awareness Month – The Asher James Foundation

For the month of May, PCHA will be focusing on American Stroke Awareness Month. In the 2nd post of our series, learn about the Asher James Foundation, founded by Jen DeBouver after the loss of her son Asher.

 

In October 2012 our whole World changed. The outcome of our son’s life was about to change. On October 5th our son Asher looked like a beautiful, somewhat healthy baby boy who was recovering from his heart surgery. He had been doing well when it came to his heart related procedures. He had gone through a fetal intervention, months before being born, a cath procedure at hours old, and then his heart surgery. He had a few minor hiccups along the way, but for the most part was doing well with recovery, so we thought.

On October 6th, Asher was red and puffy. My husband questioned the doctors as to why he was so red and puffy, but they didn’t really have an answer. It was the weekend, not much was really done to get one. By Monday, we really had no answers until finally they told us he had blood clots. The clots were in both jugular veins, and both arms.

It’s funny how dates stick with you. October 8, 2012. The day my son got his death sentence. When they told me he had blood clots, that is exactly what I thought because I didn’t really know much about them. What I thought I had heard was that they were deadly. And. They. Are.  I had no idea babies could get blood clots.

We met with the Hemotologist and she started him on different blood thinners, but she explained to us that there were no medications for children, especially infants when it came to blood clots. She reached out to colleagues across the country to find a treatment plan for Asher. Adult medications was the only option. We began treatment and it seemed to be working.

And then it wasn’t. The clots would redevelop.

Sadly, on October 23rd, Asher would lose his battle with these blood clots. Asher was a fighter and SO strong. He battled these clots for over 2 weeks. He inspired me with how much he fought, so before we even left the hospital, I had decided, in my shocked, grief filled state that I wanted to start a foundation in his memory. I wanted his fight against blood clots to continue.

So a few months later, Asher James Congenital Heart Disease & Thrombosis Foundation was created. I knew I didn’t want another parent to be shocked that their child could get blood clots. I wanted them to receive information while they were in the hospital of signs and symptoms of a blood clot. We started working with groups that deliver care bags to CHD patients and supplying them with our signs and symptoms cards.

Asher James Foundation has worked with Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital on spreading awareness in children’s blood clots by sponsoring Children’s Blood Clot Awareness Day. We have also been to Washington D.C. to advocate on children’s blood clots.

 

Each year for Asher’s birthday we hold a softball event where we play Chicago style softball against our local PCHA IL group. It’s a fun day remembering Asher, spreading awareness, and collecting things to donate to the CHD and blood clot patients in the hospital. We usually sell stuffed giraffes and donate one with each purchase. This year we are doing a book drive to collect giraffe themed books to donate to the patients. Asher would have been going to Kindergarten this year, and I’m sure he would have loved reading books.

 

A lot of research has been done in the past 5 years and treatment in children’s blood clots has come a long way. There are better treatments and survival ratings than when Asher was in the hospital. We had the privilege to meet with researchers at the University of Iowa to learn about some of the advancements.

If you provide care bags to hospitals where children could be at risks for blood clots and would like to add our signs and symptoms cards, please reach out to us and we would love to send you some. www.asherjamesfoundation.org.

 

 

Jen is a bereaved mom of 2, Olivia and Asher and a rainbow mom to Nina. Jen and her husband JD started Asher James Congenital Heart Disease & Thrombosis Foundation after losing Asher to provide support and awareness in children’s blood clots. In the past, Jen was the bereavement coordinator for Mended Little Hearts National and Mended Little Hearts of Chicago She decided to take a break to focus on her rainbow after all. She continues to do projects such as Grief: A Mother’s Project and currently the Rainbow of Hope Project. Each year she and her husband hold a softball event for Asher’s birthday, which includes collecting something (stuffed puppy or dog or books) to donate to CHD patients at Lurie Children’s Hospital. She also works with her sister-in-law to collect blankets for Olivia’s Blankets in memory of Olivia.

Jen is very open about her losses, and feels that by being open she can help others through speaking about their own loss or help others to learn how to be sensitive to those that have gone through a loss.

An Open Letter to Jimmy Kimmel

As many of you have seen, Jimmy Kimmel made headlines this morning, after his heartfelt monologue last night on Jimmy Kimmel Live. Jimmy shared the story of how his son Billy was recently diagnosed with Tetralogy of Fallot and Pulmonary Atresia and underwent open heart surgery, shortly after birth. The Pediatric Congenital Heart Association would like to take a moment to extend a kind hand of support  and compassion to the Kimmel Family, in an open letter by Amy Basken. 


 

Dear Jimmy,

As a card carrying member for more than 12 years, I’d like to welcome you to the club that no one wants to be a part of. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a lifelong condition, and the journey is filled with storms and rainbows. But, let me reassure you, membership includes a fierce family of people who are at all stages on this journey and are ready to walk arm and arm with you.

Like you, I channeled all of my emotions into action. And let me tell you, it has made a difference. But you – in 12 minutes, you captured my 12 years of work! More about this later.

You are still at the beginning of your journey. Take care of yourself, take care of your family. Hug, heal and connect. There is healing power in talking with someone who has walked this path before.

Learn. Membership in this club requires learning a new language. As a parent, those first few hours were like drinking through a fire hose. For weeks I would recall a new bit or piece of information, or argue that I was never told something when, indeed, I had. Finding good quality resources can be reassuring and eye opening. There are the simple things to learn – CHD is a structural defect of the heart, present at birth or 1in100 babies are born with CHD. There are the more complex things – how to spell Tetralogy of Fallot with Pulmonary Atresia, how to say it ten times fast, or even how to explain it to someone else. Or that there is no cure, it requires a lifetime of specialized care, and what exactly that means for your child. Learn as much as possible but most importantly, advocate for your son’s care.

Ask Questions. Lots and lots of questions. I found that having several trusted experts including parents and other providers helped me to bounce around thoughts, ideas, concerns and dreams in a safe space. 12 years later, I still ask questions. Lots and lots of questions.

Once you’ve gotten to a place where you can breathe, really breathe, then you can channel your energy and passion to giving back. And boy do we need you. We need you to be relentless in your pursuit of the needs you identified in your 12 minutes:

  1. Awareness – Despite being the most common birth defect, it is still relatively hidden. And as a result seriously underfunded.
  2. Research – Federal funding for research dollars is essential. At the Pediatric Congenital Heart Association we helped draft and are now working to pass legislation specifically aimed at improving federal CHD research funding at the NIH as well as public health research at the CDC.
  3. Access to Health Care – on behalf of PCHA, my son spoke at a briefing at the U.S. Capitol about his CHD and the need for coverage of his pre-existing condition.
  4. Hospital Outcomes Transparency – you wanted the best care possible for your son, and certainly received that at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles. Fortunately, you had access to resources who could understand the data and help guide you. Most families do not. At PCHA we have been working since 2013 to help promote public reporting of congenital heart center outcomes.

Learning your child has congenital heart disease is devastating. But there is hope. And we are here to help.

I’d like to introduce you to the Pediatric Congenital Heart Association. A “one stop shop” for education, support, and advocacy, everything I’ve been talking about. They are there through all the stages, from learning to doing. I urge you to get, and more importantly, stay engaged. Join the thousands of other patients, families, care providers, doctors and surgeons who recognize the need for learning, sharing and support.

Welcome to the club. Although we are worlds apart, united in the most undesirable way, together We Are Conquering CHD.

Amy Basken,

Heart Mom
Co-Founder and Director of Programs – Pediatric Congenital Heart Association
On behalf of our national volunteers and the 2.4 million people living with CHD and their families that we represent.

Find us on Social Media:

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PCHA Media Relations

Contact PCHA

Inquiries from reporters and members of the media, please email advocacy@conqueringchd.org or call (608) 370-3739.

Frequently Requested Information:

Key CHD Facts:

  • Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) consists of problems with the heart’s structure that are present at birth with potential lifelong implications.
  • CHD is the most common birth defect.
  • 1 in 100 babies are born with CHD.
  • Nearly 40,000 infants in the U.S. are born with CHD each year.
  • CHD is the leading cause of birth defect related deaths.
  • Approximately 25% of babies born with CHD will require life-saving intervention in the first weeks of life.
  • Approximately every 15 minutes a family learns their child has CHD.
  • There is no cure for CHD.
  • Estimates suggest there are 2.4 million Americans living with CHD.
  • People with CHD are at risk for serious medical complications and require specialized care for life.
  • CHD is now the most common form of heart disease during pregnancy in the U.S.
  • Costs for hospitalizations related to congenital heart disease were more than $6 billion in 2013.

For additional information, please reference our CHD Fact Sheet.

About PCHA

The Pediatric Congenital Heart Association’s mission is to “Conquer Congenital Heart Disease.”  We are founded on the key purpose to be the resounding voice of the pediatric patient population and are accomplishing this through collaboration with patients, parents, providers, and partner organizations in order to improve quality and outcomes through CHD education, support, research and awareness.

Our key program areas include:

  • Patient Advocacy and Policy Work
  • Promotion of Federal Research and Surveillance Funding
  • Patient Engaged Care and Patient Empowerment
  • Patient Education and Support
  • Transparency and Public Reporting of Hospital Outcomes
  • Quality Improvement
  • Sustained Access to Recommended Specialized Care Throughout the Lifespan
  • Promotion of Meaningful and Targeted Research

 

 

Action Alert: FY2018 Appropriations

 

Email your Representative, today, and ask her or him to sign the Appropriations letter being circulated by CHD legislative champions Representatives Schiff and Bilirakis in support of congenital heart disease-related public health research and surveillance initiatives at the CDC.

There is a lot going on in Washington D.C.  While we haven’t stopped our efforts focusing on getting our Senators and Representatives to co-sponsor the Congenital Heart Futures Reauthorization Act, we need to take a minute to remind them to keep our existing funding in the budget to help the CDC do their important work.

 

Sending an email is simple!!

  1. Find your legislator’s contact information.
    1. Visit  www.house.gov
    2. If this is your first time reaching out, use the contact form on the legislator’s website to send your email.
    3. If you have identified the Health LA, or had a previous contact with your member or a member of their staff, please feel free to use the direct email address you were given.
  2. Copy and paste the sample email, below, and personalize:
    1. Include your legislator’s name
    2. Add your own personal story where indicated
    3. Sign with your name, city, state and contact info
  3. Send it!

—— SAMPLE EMAIL —–

Dear Representative xyz,

As you are working on appropriations requests for FY2018, I urge you to show your support for continued funding of essential congenital heart disease-related public health research and surveillance initiatives at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect and the leading cause of birth defect-related infant mortality. Nearly one third of children born with CHD will require life-saving medical intervention such as surgery or a heart catheterization procedure. With improved medical treatment options, survival rates are improving with a population of 2.4 million and growing. However, there is no cure. Children and adults with congenital heart disease require ongoing, costly, specialized cardiac care and face a lifelong risk of permanent disability and premature death. As a result, healthcare utilization among the congenital heart disease population is significantly higher than the general population.

As part of these ongoing public health surveillance and research efforts, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently published key findings that report hospital costs for congenital heart disease exceeded $6 billion in 2013.

Congenital Heart Disease is common and costly, and attention to the needs of this community is critical.

Please show your support by signing the Appropriations Letter being circulated by Representatives Bilirakis and Schiff.  To add your name, please contact Shayne Woods with Bilirakis (Shayne.Woods@mail.house.gov), or Anthony Theissen with Schiff (Anthony.Theissen@mail.house.gov)
This is important to me because: (ONE-TWO SENTENCES)
Share your story briefly, here.

Odds are, someone you know has been impacted by the most common birth defect.

Join us as together, we are #ConqueringCHD.

Sincerely,
Your Name
Address