School Intervention Series: A Complete Resource Guide

PCHA welcomes back Kyle Herma, School Intervention Specialist at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin School for part 2 of her 3 part series about School Intervention. If you missed her first post, you can find it here. Today, we re-share Kyle’s wealth of information on navigating a school’s system without a dedicated school liaison. Her complete resource list is included at the end of this post for easy reference. 

Going back to school after a diagnosis or hospitalization can be scary for everyone! Families might worry about how their child will transition, schools might worry about how they will care for the child, and children might worry about what to say and how to act around friends they haven’t seen in a while (just to name a few examples). Each and every one of these concerns is valid and understandable. So, how do we swing that pendulum of emotion from feeling anxious to feeling prepared? I like to think of it as a 3-step process: proactive planning, clear communication, and seeking appropriate supports. The goal for this second part of my series is to give you a variety of resources, tips, tricks, and recommendations to successfully accomplish all three.

Proactive Planning

School is one of the best distractions a child can have! School provides a predictable structure with scheduled events, activities, responsibilities, and expectations. These are all things that will greatly benefit children who have experienced significant unpredictability in their lives. Yet, we know that return to routine can be overwhelming at times. The Center for Children with Special Needs and Seattle Children’s partnered up to create a great checklist for planning your child’s return to school. You can find that checklist here.

When I meet with families who are preparing for a new school year I always share two “Back-to-School” information sheets. Battling the Back-to-School Butterflies helps families plan for the big day by suggesting some tips for easing back into a school routine and Back-to-School To Do’s is a list of compiled questions to ask yourself while planning for an organized transition back to school. Thinking points, if you will!

Attendance is another major topic that comes up when I am working with families on school re-integration. We all know that children with chronic illness (regardless of the type) miss school more frequently than their healthy peers. Since the attendance patterns children form in school are closely linked to their ability to successfully maintain a job as an adult, I always stress attempting to make medical appointments before or after school, and if this is not possible, to work with your child’s teacher to find a time where the least core curriculum will be missed. Remember, missing a class period does not just mean you are missing the information covered in the textbook, it also means you are missing explanations, examples, peer questions, opportunities to practice and share reasoning’s, etc. – things that cannot be replicated when completing the make-up assignment at home. Proactive Planning for Necessary Absences is the info sheet that I often share with families as they create a plan that seeks to accommodate both a busy appointment schedule and optimum school attendance. It won’t always work out perfectly and that’s OK – your child’s health comes first! I just want it to be something that’s considered along the way.

Clear and Consistent Communication

Sharing information about your child’s medical history, current medical status, or potential medical challenges in the future can be really hard and often emotional. Schools understand that. They don’t want to know all of your child’s medical history to be nosey; they need to know it so they can ensure they are providing the best and safest care. It is within those uncomfortable conversations that trusting relationships are built – it’s OK to be vulnerable and it’s OK to not know all the answers. Use this opportunity to work together to find them. Ten Tips for Caregivers is an excellent starting point for quick tips on creating those meaningful partnerships with your child’s teacher/school.

Next, I encourage every family I work with to create some form of Getting to Know Me document to be given to teachers, administrators, coaches, substitutes … any staff who works with your child. Once again, I found one that I love while searching the Center for Children with Special Needs website (www.cshcn.org). This Getting To Know Me template highlights the child’s interests and strengths before getting into medical diagnosis and current health status. That’s how it should be – after all, were talking about a child!

In addition to informing all teachers and school staff, I also encouraging the sharing of basic information with the families of classroom peers. The purpose of sending out a class letter (much like one you would receive if a child in the classroom had a peanut allergy) is to make sure classmates are washing their hands regularly, cleaning their shared and personal spaces frequently, and either staying home or communicating when they are sick. The class letter is the most frequently requested of all the resources I share with patient families. As you’ll see from my sample letter, I encourage including vaccination information on the opposite side for any family that may be overdue for or on the fence about getting vaccinated. Please personalize it using your preferred wording and share it with your child’s teacher … it could mean far fewer germs spreading through the classroom each year.

Bullying is also a topic that comes up over and over again with the patients I see. Bullying is something I take very seriously and prioritize whenever possible, however often times when I investigate these concerns the findings are split. Sometimes true bullying is taking place and we need to put an intervention plan into action immediately. Other times (more often than not), we are finding that children’s with chronic illnesses who’ve experienced long hospital stays and constant one-on-one attention from adults, tend to have a hard time re-integrating into environments that follow expectations of sharing, turn-taking, and delayed gratification. In many of the cases I’ve reviewed, the intervention that we ultimately put into place, is re-learning appropriate group social skills and accepting that each day moments of success (where we get what we want) and disappointment (moments where we do not) and learning how to appropriately communicate the feelings associate with both. Parents Act Now is a great starting point for understanding what bullying is and how to begin a conversation with your child’s school to ensure that all students feel safe and respected at all times.

The Power of Effective Support Services

I urge families to stay aware of normal developmental guidelines and corresponding developmental milestones. I am a firm believer that all children develop differently and at their own pace, however I also know that neurodevelopmental differences due to medical diagnoses, repairs, and treatments can appear at many different times. There is no academic, social, or emotional delay that cannot be accommodated for, however, it first must be identified. I highly urge you to seek some sort of neurodevelopmental follow-up evaluation from your medical provider if you do begin noticing a developmental difference or delay. The National Association of School Psychologists published a great brief guide to understanding and identifying disabilities. You can find that here. Remember, the earlier you seek necessary support, the better the chances of a positive outcome.

When it comes to establishing support services in school, one thing that I get asked all of the time is, “Who’s responsibility is it?” It doesn’t matter the illness at hand, the child’s current status, or even the rest of the question. The answer is always, “It’s everybody’s responsibility.” I often use a guide for families, schools, and students that breaks down individual responsibilities nicely. You can find that info sheet here. Almost every patient we see has some sort of special education service in place, or qualifies for one. My families often come to me with several questions regarding what services are available for their child and how they go about getting some sort of help in place. Special education support accounts for 24% of my current school interventions – nearly a quarter of the families I work with. To make it easier, I’ve created explanations about the three major services that are offered in schools: a Response to Intervention (RtI) Plan, a 504 Plan, and anIndividualized Education Plan (IEP). Click on each link to learn more about what each program offers and the criteria to qualify for that service. Click here to see a useful graphic for deciding which service best fits your child’s needs. There is one main thing that every parent must know and be prepared to challenge: a school can never refuse or delay a parent’s request for a special education evaluation (“it’s too early/late in the school year” or “they won’t qualify for these services” should NEVER be accepted answers). Unfortunately, families often still run into problems requesting or receiving these services for a variety of reasons. Click here to read the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction’s guidelines for disagreeing with a school’s decision and the information for a full mediation and resolution process. Please note, these guidelines vary by state. Check with your state’s Department of Public Instruction for your most accurate information.

I couldn’t end without the mention of another one of the Herma Heart Center’s top school integration programs. Project ADAM (Automated Defibrillators in Adam’s Memory) is a national hospital-based community outreach program supporting implementation of written and practiced cardiac emergency response plans for sudden cardiac arrest in schools. My final piece of advice for all cardiac families – whether it’s returning for a new school year or school re-integration after an extended hospital stay- make sure your child’s school has both an up-to-date Automated External Defibrillator (AED) and an emergency cardiac response plan in place. You will find the Project ADAM Wisconsin Heart Safe Schools Checklist here. Take this checklist to your school’s nurse or administrator and request they complete and return it to Project ADAM if they haven’t already done so. Project ADAM will work with the school to make sure they have the necessary technology, appropriate emergency action plans, and a schedule of practices and drills to maintain optimum cardiac safety in school.

I hope you’ve found some useful information to set your child on a path to a successful school year. Below you will find one final recap of my shared resources and links. Remember, you are the expert on your child, but I urge you take advantage of those individuals, agencies, and programs there to support you!

Complete School Intervention Resource List

Proactive Planning

Communication

Services


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Kyle Herma is the School Intervention Specialist serving the Herma Heart Center at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. Kyle has been at Children’s since February 2015 conducting a formal pilot study on school intervention and the impact it has on a child’s overall medical outcome and quality of life. Prior to this position, Kyle was a teacher at Milwaukee College Prep’s 38th street campus. In both roles, Kyle has shown her dedication to serving children who are placed at-risk for school failure and ultimate mission to achieve equal access to quality education for all.

Support PCHA in the Final Hours of Macy’s Shop for a Cause Charity Challenge!

PCHA is involved in the Macy’s Shop for a Cause Charity Challenge, a friendly fundraising competition raising money for causes like ours. We’ve got just over a few hours to go before our campaign ends. As of this morning we are sitting in 11th place sitting at $13,300 raised. When you add in the generous $3,000 from one of our Medical Advisory Board members as a Challenge Grant and the additional $2,000 from Macy’s we won during Bonus Challenge #1 that brings us to $18,300!! That’s amazing work and brings us almost to our goal of raising $25,000.

It’s not too late to help us Conquer CHD!

We are moving Mountains:

  • Hosting 2 national conferences in 2017 about patient empowerment through public reporting of hospital outcome information.
  • Received national coverage of our efforts on this issue in U.S. News and World report
  • Co-hosted a congenital heart legislative conference discussing public health policy, research and data for congenital heart disease.
  • Presently have a congenital heart disease research law working it’s way through Congress
We are touching lives:
  • In the first 6 months of 2017, we distributed more than 3000 Conquering CHD care packages providing essential resources and support directly to patients and their families
  • Shared more than 5000 copies of our Guided Questions Tool to help patients and family have important conversations with their doctors.
  • Reach between 50,000-200,000 people each week on social media with our education, support, research and awareness messaging.
PCHA is the resounding voice of the congenital heart community. Our voice is strengthened by the involvement of all of those who share our mission. 
Help us reach our goal of raising $25,000 to further that mission. 
  • $5 Provides a family with an educational resource card
  • $50 Allows us to provide a Conquering CHD care package of educational materials and Comfort items to a family whose child is in the hospital
  • $100 Helps us reach 20,000 people through social media
  • $250 Helps support an educational hospital site visit.
  • $500 Sponsors a parent or patient to attend our Legislative Conference in Washington D.C., and advocate for all those impacted by CHD by educating our members of Congress about congenital heart disease on Capital Hill.
 

 

 To Learn more & Donate CLICK HERE

School Intervention Series: Making A Difference

With the summer winding down, it’s just about time to head Back-to-School. Join us through a brief break from our Mental Health Series, as we re-introduce guest writer Kyle Herma, School Intervention Specialist at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. The blog will feature Kyle’s 3-part series for PCHA beginning with an introduction on what she does and why. Over the next couple weeks, we will share Kyle’s tips, tricks and recommendations for navigating a school’s system without a dedicated school liaison (and how to start advocating for one in your cardiac center) and provide a collection of resources on how to ensure your child is getting all of the services and supports required to have equal access to a quality education.

 

 

Twenty nine years ago my sister was born with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS), a congenital heart defect that left a chamber of her heart severely underdeveloped at birth. This was at a time when medical technology and surgical repairs options were very limited for a complex baby like my sister. While she ended up losing her battle with HLHS, her short time on Earth ultimately began a battle much greater – the fight to eradicate congenital heart defects completely and in the process, improve medical outcomes and quality of life for those currently affected. Today, the Herma Heart Center (HHC) at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin is known for having the best published survival rates of HLHS in the world. However, a top recognition like this is not achieved without constant work towards excellence and innovation in all areas of care.

 

Herma Heart Center

How does this relate to PCHA’s “Back-to-School” theme this month? It does on so many levels! Two years ago I was a kindergarten teacher, loving every minute of every day guiding 4 and 5-year-old kids as they discovered their world. I worked in the inner city of Milwaukee at a low-income Charter School – all of my students considered “at-risk” due to a variety of different statistics. Every day I sought to plan lessons that not only were rich in academic content and student engagement, but also focused on building a classroom culture of strong future leaders and community advocates. While I had always been involved with the Herma Heart Center on various levels because of my family’s deep connection, I was a teacher. I loved being a teacher.

In 2015, I got a call. The Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up Program, one of the HHC’s leading whole-child focused programs, was expanding and looking to hire a School Intervention Specialist after they noticed a very high need for multifaceted school intervention in students with complex health needs – specifically in the area of pediatric cardiac neurodevelopment. The job requirements outlined a liaison-type service, with the goal of working to ensure clear and consistent communication between the medical staff, the family, and the child’s school at all times. I began researching far and wide. I wanted to learn everything I could about how CHD affects a child’s neurodevelopmental functioning and what type of supports schools have in place to modify for or accommodate these children. All of my searches came up empty! There was nothing. While significant literary research supported that children with complex health needs and chronic illness are at a greater risk of reduced student engagement, higher disruptive behavior, lower academic achievement, an increased exposure to bullying (among many other well-documented negative educational outcomes), structured programs for school re-entry and intervention are rare. In this moment I knew that I needed to step in to fill a role much larger than a classroom teacher.

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The School Intervention Program officially “went live” in February 2015. I began with a very focused population of heart transplant patients that pinpointed those re-integrating into school post-transplant, but also offered intervention services to all of our heart transplant patients no matter how many years post-transplant they were. The response was huge. My patient population quickly grew to all heart transplant patients (including those wait-listed for transplant) and several patients with advanced heart failure who were anticipating a future transplant. My pilot study served 55 cardiac patients, ages 3 (preschool) to 24 (college). The schools’ concerns that were addressed included: attendance and absence support, special education support, attention and behavior plans, and documentation/medical record communication – just to name a few of the big categories. Of those 55 patients, 57% have exited the program with their school concern fully resolved, 36% still receive ongoing school intervention but are making great progress towards their school goals, and 7% transitioned to different medical centers where school intervention could no longer be followed. I’ve witnessed one of my high school student graduate with his class just 5 months post-transplant, I’ve heard from a school nurse that she could not believe a student is finally getting to live a “normal” life without any medical interventions needed during the school day, and I’ve helped a mom send her 7 year old to school for the first time because she finally felt confident the school could handle his needs.

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You may be thinking, “That’s great, but my child did not have a transplant. This doesn’t help us.” I am hear to tell you that it does! By doing a formal pilot study on a small population of patients and proving there is an urgent need for formalized school support, I am establishing both attractive outcomes data and the sustainability of this type of position. I frequently share these outcomes with colleagues, speak about my work at a director and leadership level, and even present at international conferences just so people can see how this seemingly non-medical work is directly related to improved medical outcomes. And guess what? People ARE listening.

 

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I am excited to be sharing with you over the next couple weeks to help bridge the very different worlds of medicine and education to ensure that children with complex health needs, specifically CHD, are not falling though the gaps. Here’s to a great school year!

 

Kyle Herma is the School Intervention Specialist serving the Herma Heart Center at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. Kyle has been at Children’s since February 2015 conducting a formal pilot study on school intervention and the impact it has on a child’s overall medical outcome and quality of life. Prior to this position, Kyle was a teacher at Milwaukee College Prep’s 38th street campus. In both roles, Kyle has shown her dedication to serving children who are placed at-risk for school failure and ultimate mission to achieve equal access to quality education for all.

Aron Matthew Northcraft

Aron’s mother Sara has been an active member of the CHD community, helping to educate people on how to support families after losing a child and advocating at the Legislative Conference in years past. Here she shares his story.

Aron Matthew Northcraft was born January 10, 2007 with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS). He was flown immediately after birth to Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC where he underwent the Norwood procedure the following day. He recovered, and in May of 2007, Aron, had the second (aka Glenn) of the three stages of surgeries required of all HLHS babies. The next 22 months of Aron’s life were spent at home simply being a little boy. Aron loved playing ball of all kinds (football and bowling were his favorites), loved Curious George and ADORED his big brothers (almost as much as they adored him)! During this time, it was very easy to forget that Aron was living with a very serious heart condition aside from the many medications he took daily.

Reality finally hit in April of 2009 when Aron went in for the third and final stage of surgery, the Fontan. Aron did not do post-Fontan well, and we found ourselves hearing the words “heart failure” and “transplant.” We soon began the journey to determine what was best for Aron. In October of 2009, we started the process of placing Aron on the heart transplant list. Unfortunately, God had other plans for our sweet boy. Aron passed away on November 19, 2009. He was such a blessing and truly a miracle! Aron will forever be in our hearts and on our minds.

When we started down the transplant road with Aron, I began to feel very angry every time I saw someone smoking. I was angry because Aron had no control over the cards he had been dealt and these “smokers” were destroying their life by their choice! Very soon, I was convicted about my health habits. Although I was not choosing to destroy my body with smoke, I was not eating right or exercising and, therefore, destroying my body by not being healthy. I decided in September (with the help of a very special lady) that I was going to start running. Our Fall was a little crazy…and heart wrenching.

After Aron passed away, I set a goal that I would like to run the Apple Blossom 10K in memory of my sweet boy! Our initial idea was to create “Team Aron” and have at least 4 people running in his memory. The more we talked about it, the more we realized how awesome it would be to have a gigantic team. We wanted to not only run in memory of Aron, but to raise awareness about Congenital Heart Defects and our local CHD support program.

Team Aron produced over 40 runners for the Apple Blossom 10K last year! We have encouraged Team Aron members to wear their shirts (if they are not running for a different cause) in as many races as they run in. In the past year Team Aron has been seen in many local foot races (Apple Blossom, Freedom Run, Apple Trample, Turkey Trot and the South Berkeley Christmas parade), a couple of local triathlons, as well as the Ford Ironman Florida.